Vanity thought #1792. VC – from thermos to quantos

Link: “Mystic Universe: An Introduction to Vedic Cosmology”.

Continuing where I left off. The chapter is about unifying theories of nature but so far it’s been mostly about thermodynamics. Yesterday I said that the author has a clear preference of quantum theory and this seems to be the way science goes, too, but today the flow is reverse – the book inducts insights from thermodynamics into quantum mechanics and does it via “semantic theory of information” – my words, google returns not quite what I have in mind. It would be nice if the book had a catchy name for this theory that solves everything but it isn’t there. Or rather it’s just another presentation of Sāṅkhya done in a contemporary language, which is a good thing because Sāṅkhya is authoritative.

Last time we left on brief description of weirdness of thermodynamic exchanges. They are not weird to us as observers and users of thermodynamics for our entire lives but they are weird for science because energy transfer goes only one way – from hot to cold – and never the other, and because energy can never be transferred in full. Incidentally, there’s a homeless woman whose baby froze to death as she was holding it in Portland a few days ago. The meme created out of this story uses a photo of a homeless man from a couple of years ago so it’s a fake. The point was that we deal with transferring heat all the time, just don’t think about it much.

Now I can’t use the word “body” when talking about thermodynamics but I don’t see any other choice. So, particles comprising a body might look alike from a science point of view but they might also carry different levels of information. These levels build up as they go from abstract to contingent and so if contingent information is present then it must include its abstract, and if we remove the abstract then the contingent layer would collapse, too.

Comparatively speaking, the hot body has both abstract and contingent levels of detail but a cold body has only abstract. When they come in contact only the contingent information is transferred from the hot body to the cold until both come to the same level of abstraction. At these point both objects have the same information and no further exchanges are possible or even necessary.

In classical physics information can be sent out regardless of whether it’s needed or not – like a light bulb which shines in all directions even when you leave the room. In semantic theory this is not possible and information transfer happens only when some of it is missing AND required. We require only stuff that we don’t have – we can’t require something we already possess, but we don’t require all of what is missing. So information must be missing first and then required as the next logical step. Then information transfer could occur. In case of two bodies in thermodynamics when they reach the same temperature there’s no missing information in either of the systems so transfer stops because of the first rule – information mush be missing.

This is where the books shifts to quantum theory and plugs it with what is missing there. Two quantum systems must be connected, or entangled in QT speak, one of them must have more information than the other, and the other must need that information so that it becomes missing and required. Only when these conditions are satisfied energy/information transfer will take place.

Current quantum theory doesn’t get that. It can’t predict neither when the particles will be emitted nor where exactly they would go. The question of where does not really arise because QT assumes that a particle/wave would fly out and will be absorbed by whatever happens to be in its path. Thermodynamics tells us that it’s all wrong – first two systems must come in contact and once that happens the when, where, and what will be exchanged will become fixed as well and we’ll know everything.

Apparent randomness and unpredictability of quantum behavior is, therefore, caused by us not knowing how two systems become entangled. I don’t think this is accepted as an obvious reason in current quantum theory but the author’s long term goal here is to propose a solution to this problem of random entanglement, which lies in semantic interpretation of karma.

Abbreviating all this we get source S, destination D, and cause C. Unless C brings S and D together they have potential for exchange but it doesn’t happen – probably because without C they are not designated as actual S and D yet, they are just “things”. In thermodynamics C is a choice to put hot and cold bodies together. In quantum theory objects don’t have to be physically close and C has to create a channel between S and D through which information can transfer. Once the channel is established information is transferred immediately. The role of causality in nature, therefore, is establishing and breaking up these channels. The author says that these channels are like roads on which information travels and that they might exist without being attached to any particular pair of source and destination. This last part is a bit unclear but okay, no biggie.

Bringing relativity into a fold, as the chapter intended, the implications of this model for cosmology are huge – light from the stars doesn’t shine in all directions equally and it hasn’t been travelling to us for billions of years. Rather it’s transmitted instantaneously as soon as a channel between the star (S) and us (D) is established. Stars don’t spam the universe with their light but rather send it to those for whom it was intended and assigned by the cause C.

Time involved in this process is spend on absorbing the light, not on its travel. It takes time for us to process the received information and come to a state when it becomes part of our system, but it’s not longer than our lifetime. To us this absorbed information manifests as life experiences. When we finally “see” the light we think it happened just now but, in fact, light has been received earlier and we were just processing it. It’s like the “aha” moment when reading a book – it takes time to process the words and realize it’s important.

The last paragraph sums it all up. As promised, there’s a unification of three fundamental theories of nature but no one theory gets to be a winner. Information transfer must happen when there’s a channel between the source and the destination. and it’s established by a third party and it’s this third agency that is missing from all branches of modern science. There’s also an interesting addition that it’s not our entire body that must receive the information but only the part which is connected to a channel. The same information, therefore, can create different experiences in us depending on how exactly the channels are created what they are connected to. To figure it all out science needs a theory of channel establishment. We have one in Sāṅkhya but it’s not the time to bring it up yet.

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