Vanity thought #1791. VC – No Unity In Diversity

Link: “Mystic Universe: An Introduction to Vedic Cosmology”.

Before moving on to the next chapter I want to say a few words about this book and potential “problems” with it. As a rule, it has no supporting quotes for its assertions about Sāṅkhya or Śrīmad Bhāgavatam whatsoever. How can we be sure that this is really what Sāṅkhya says? If we check the content of Śāṅkhya related chapters in the Third Canto we might not even recognize what is presented here. The answer is that it’s not so much the quotes that we need but thorough understanding of principles – principles on which we can already easily agree.

We all know that we change bodies, for example, but how many of us pursue this principle logically to realize that our bodies do not move through space from one end of the room to another, that this motion is only an illusion, and so our models of space which are built on it are an illusion, and that out entire grade school curriculum on geometry or physics is just one big lie. That’s why Śrīla Prabhupāda dismissed Moon travel a full decade before it happened, before coming to America. In Vedic science travel means changing of bodies, you change into a moon body and you are on the Moon. You don’t change into a moon body and you aren’t. Very simple.

How many quotes do we need to realize that? None, we already know everything we need to know, we just don’t think deep enough about it.

Another example – all empirically perceptive sense objects are created to match living beings desires for sensations – they do not exist independently or objectively. None of them. One might object that he remembers nothing like that from chapters on Sāṅkhya but one need not to search that far – Prabhupāda’s Introduction to Bhagavad Gītā is enough:

    When we see wonderful things happening in the cosmic nature, we should know that behind this cosmic manifestation there is a controller. Nothing could be manifested without being controlled. It is childish not to consider the controller. For instance, a child may think that an automobile is quite wonderful to be able to run without a horse or other animal pulling it, but a sane man knows the nature of the automobile’s engineering arrangement.

It’s a simple principle that underwrites the entire creation. Nothing could be manifested without being controlled. Nothing appears on its own. So what if Prabhupāda only mentions Kṛṣṇa as the ultimate controller without describing controllers in between, like Lord Brahmā? This is a simple principle that we all sort of know but don’t really understand so we think that planets, stars, rocks, minerals, oceans etc are “dead” matter and we accept scientific explanations for them that don’t require neither God nor any kind of consciousness to produce. Maybe in their bubble they don’t but all it means is that they don’t know the whole truth about this process, which means they are in illusion and have only slight connection to reality. So are we, but at least we have proper sources of knowledge which we can utilize if we want to understand true nature of things or at least understand how and where science goes off track.

Back to the book. There are three major theories in science – quantum theory for small stuff, thermodynamics for our size stuff, and relativity for universe size stuff. Each of them emerged from classical physics which were linear and deterministic. Quantum mechanics is still linear but non-deterministic, relativity is deterministic but non-linear, and thermodynamics has become neither linear nor deterministic. Interesting classification but if you don’t immediately recall what the difference between linear and non-linear is it kind of loses its effect. I’d volunteer to say that in linear systems output is directly proportional to input but if you want to figure out if that is a sufficient definition and all the implications of major theories branching out this particular way you are on your own.

The point is that there’s no one theory that could describe all phenomena. The author here demonstrates a slant towards quantum theory to be the one science that rules them all. In the previous chapters we’ve seen how interpreting light from stars in the quantum way leads to discarding corner stones of relativity such as constant speed of light and judging distances to the stars by their luminosity. Today it’s thermodynamics way to be defeated by the mighty quanta.

As far as I know, this has already been done and there’s a tentative way to express thermodynamics through the theory of quantum fields but this should be interesting anyway.

First there’s a description of principal differences between classical physics and thermodynamics. In classical physics when two objects collide it’s possible that one of them transfers all its energy to the other, like one billiard ball could hit another and stop itself. This never happens in thermodynamics. If you bring two bodies together, one hot one cold, the hot one will never ever transfer all of its energy to the cold one. They’d rather reach the state of equilibrium where they both become warm. In classical physics two object hit each other with an equal force. The smaller one feels a greater effect than the big one but there’s an effect on both. In thermodynamics cold body doesn’t transfer any energy to the hotter one, it all goes one way – from hot to cold.

The book explains this one sided and never complete energy transfer in the language of Sāṅkhya as it has been formulated in the earlier section of the book – there are abstract objects and adding information to them creates contingent objects with greater level of detail. Are there any quotes for that? Not that I know of but it’s restating familiar Sāṅkhya’s processes about three guṇas producing one element out of the other in a different language, that’s all.

Matter is thus constructed from layers of information. There are layers of abstract information to which details are added to create the next layer. Some particles, which we think bodies are made of, might look the same but if they carry different levels of information they belong to different layers – some to abstract and some to contingent. Since contingent information is produced from abstract then existence of a contingent symbol means there should exist an abstract symbol already. And if you remove the abstract then contingent will collapse, too.

Next comes the actual explanation of heat transfer but I’m afraid it’s too long to start it now. Another day.

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